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C8 Lawsuit | Dupont C8 Lawsuit

C8 Lawsuit | Dupont C8 Lawsuit

C8 Lawsuit, Dupont C8 Lawsuit | Dupont C8, Dupont C8 Parkersburg, Dupont C8 Ohio, Injuries Lawsuit, C8 Cancer Lawsuit, Dupont C8 Lawsuit

Tens of thousands of Ohio and West Virginia residents who lived and worked near DuPont’s Washington Works Plant in Parkersburg, West Virginia may be entitled to compensation for illnesses they developed due to exposure to C8-contaminated drinking water. In October 2012, a scientific panel created under the 2005 Dupont C8 Lawsuit settlement established links between C8 in drinking water and a host of illnesses, including thyroid, kidney and testicular cancer, ulcerative colitis/inflammatory bowel disease, pregnancy-induced hypertension (pre-ecamplsia), and high cholesterol. As per the 2005 Dupont C8 Lawsuit settlement, individuals who lived and worked in one of six West Virginia and Ohio water districts for a least a year prior to December 3, 2004 now have the right to file an individual C8 lawsuit if they developed one of those linked illnesses. West Virginia and Ohio water districts affected by the Dupont C8 Lawsuit include:

  • Little Hocking, Ohio
  • City of Belpre, Ohio
  • Tuppers Plains, Ohio
  • Village of Pomeroy, Ohio
  • Lubeck Public Service District, West Virginia
  • Mason County Public Service District, West Virginia

If you or a loved one developed an illness determined to be linked to C8 exposure, filing a C8 lawsuit could ensure that you and your family have the funds to cover all of your damages, including your medical bills, inability to work, and pain and suffering. However, to take advantage of your legal rights under the Dupont C8 Lawsuit settlement, it’s important you contact an experienced attorney as soon as possible, to ensure you are treated fairly and receive the compensation you deserve.

C8 Lawsuit Information | Dupont C8 Lawsuit Information

C8, known as ammonium perfluorooctanoate or PFOA, is used to manufacture Teflon. Starting in the 1950s, DuPont manufactured Teflon at its Washington Works Plant in Parkersburg, where it discharged large quantities of C8 waste into the adjacent Ohio River for decades. It also disposed of that waste in its Dry Run and Letart landfills. It is now known that exposure to C8 poses numerous health risks, and in 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board determined that C-8 should be identified as a likely human carcinogen. In 2000, 3M voluntarily stopped producing C8, while DuPont has promised to phase out use of the chemical by 2015.

Detectable levels of C8 have been found in the Ohio River around the DuPont Washington Works plant, and in water wells in six Ohio and West Virginia water districts in the vicinity of the facility. In 2005, DuPont agreed to the Dupont C8 Lawsuit settlement, which required it to establish a scientific panel to explore the possible health consequences of C8 exposure. In October 2012, the 3-member C8 Science Panel published its findings, after it determined there was a probable link between exposure to C8 in drinking water and several disorders, including:

  • Kidney cancer
  • Testicular cancer
  • Thyroid disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis)
  • Preeclampsia (high blood pressure during pregnancy)
  • High cholesterol

Under the terms of the Dupont C8 Lawsuit settlement, thousands of people who lived and worked in the affected water districts during the stipulated time period are now eligible to file an individual C8 lawsuit if they developed one of these illnesses. Relatives of these individuals may also file a wrongful death claim if their loved one’s death was associated with a linked illness.

C8 Lawsuit Personal Injury Claims | Dupont C8 Lawsuit Claims

In April 2013, the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation established a consolidated litigation for C8 lawsuits alleging personal injury and death due to the pollution emitted from DuPont’s Washington Works plant. Legal experts predict that thousands of claims will eventually be filed in this litigation. All of the C8 lawsuits pending thus far allege that DuPont knew as early as 1980s that the C8 discharged from the Washington Works plant was polluting water supplies in Ohio and West Virginia, yet concealed this knowledge from the public.

To be eligible to file a C8 lawsuit in this litigation, potential plaintiffs must have lived or worked in one of the six West Virginia or Ohio water districts for at least a year prior to December 3, 2004, and develop one of the illnesses designated by the C8 Science Panel as a probable linked disease. Additional information on filing a C8 lawsuit for personal injury or wrongful death, as well as free C8 lawsuit evaluations, can be obtained by completing the online form on the right, or call toll free, 1-800-399-0795.

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C8 Information

Numerous Ohio and West Virginia residents in C8 lawsuits against DuPont were allegedly sickened by drinking water contaminated with C8, a toxic chemical that was discharged from the DuPont Washington Works plant in Parkersburg, West Virginia, for decades. C8, also known as perfluorooctanoate, or PFOA, is one of the chemicals used in Teflon, and has been linked to a number of health ailments, including:

  • Kidney cancer
  • Testicular cancer
  • Thyroid disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis)
  • Preeclampsia (high blood pressure during pregnancy)
  • High cholesterol

Evidence suggests that DuPont knew for years that C8 discharged from the Washington Works plant was contaminating groundwater in Ohio and West Virginia, yet concealed this knowledge from the public. Now, thousands of people who lived and worked in water districts in the vicinity of the DuPont facility may be suffering, or are at risk for developing, serious illnesses and disorders due to their exposure to drinking water polluted by this dangerous chemical. Those who were harmed by DuPont’s C8 pollution should receive the justice they deserve.

DuPont C8 Timeline

April 8, 2013: C8 Lawsuit MDL Established: The U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (JPML) creates In Re: E.I. Du Pont De Nemours and Company C-8 Personal Injury Litigation, MDL No. 2433, for all DuPont C8 lawsuits alleging personal injury or wrongful death stemming from C8 pollution discharged from the DuPont Washington Works plant in Parkersburg, West Virginia. At the time, more than two dozen DuPont C8 lawsuits were pending in the litigation, but legal experts expect hundreds more to be filed.

October 2012: C8 Science Panels Say Probable Link Between C8 And Cancers: The C8 Science Panel, established as part of the 2005 DuPont C8 class action settlement, concludes that there is a probable link between C8 exposure and a number of disorders, including testicular and kidney cancers, pregnancy-induced hypertension (pre-eclampsia), thyroid disease, high cholesterol and inflammatory bowel disease.

February 2005: DuPont C8 Lawsuit Settlement: DuPont agrees to settle a Dupont C8 Lawsuit filed on behalf of 70,000 West Virginia and Ohio residents living and working near the Washington Works plant who were exposed to C8 tainted drinking water. Among other things, the settlement required the company to establish the C8 Science Panel to explore “probable links” between C8 exposure and diseases. In the event of such a finding, anyone who was exposed to C8-tainted drinking water for at least a year prior to December 3, 2004 and developed a “probable link” disease would also have the right to file an individual DuPont C8 exposure lawsuit seeking compensation for their injuries.

March 2002: Tupper Plains Ohio C8 Contamination: C8 is found in the water supply for Tupper Plains, Ohio, located 15 miles downstream on the Ohio River from the Washington Works plant.

January 2002: Ohio C8 Contamination: Drinking water supplies in Little Hocking, Ohio are found to be contaminated with C8.

August 2001: West Virgina C8 Lawsuit: West Virginia residents file Dupont C8 Lawsuit against DuPont.

May 2000: 3M Phases Out C8: 3M, which used the chemical to manufacture Scotchgard, decides to phase out C8, due to pressure from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Scotchgard would ultimately be reformulated.

October 2000: C8 Lawsuit Settlement With West Virginia Farmer: DuPont reaches an out-of-court settlement that resolves a C8 lawsuit filed by a West Virginia farmer who alleged the chemical killed his cattle and made his family ill.

1984: DuPont Tests Show Signs Of C8 In Drinking Water: For the first time, DuPont’s tests turn up C8 in drinking water around the Washington Works plant. That same year, the company opens the Dry Run Land fill near Lubeck, West Virginia, where it disposes of C8-contaminated wastes. Company tests have since confirmed that C8 is leaching from the landfill into Dry Run Creek at levels above DuPont’s internal limits.

1982: First Warnings Regarding C8 Discharge From Washington Works Plant: For the first time, concerns arise at DuPont about the C8 pollution discharged from its Washington Works plant, with the company’s director of employee relations warning that “there is obviously great potential for the current or future exposure of members of the local community from emissions leaving the plant perimeter.”

March 1982: DuPont Allows Women To Work In C8 Areas: DuPont reverses a ban on female employees working in C8 areas at the Washington Works facility after studies funded by the company find no link between birth defects and C8 exposure.

May 1981: DuPont Employees Positive For C8 Have Babies Born With Birth Defects:
DuPont determines that five of its employees at the Washington Works plant who tested positive for C8 in their blood had given birth to babies with eye-related birth defects.

March 1981: 3M C8 Lab Study: A study conducted by 3M ties C8 exposure to eye defects in rats. DuPont decides to bar female employees of child-bearing age from working in areas of the Washington Works plant where C8 is used.

1980: C8 Study Finds C8 Toxic To Lab Animals: A study conducted by 3M finds that C8 is toxic to rats and monkeys. That same year, DuPont determines that ”people accumulate C8” and ”continued exposure is not tolerable,” prompting it to begin sampling workers’ blood for the chemical.

1979: 3M Reports C8 In Employees: 3M reports that C8 has been detected in the blood of its workers. While this raises concern at DuPont in regards to Washington Works employees, the company keeps the information to itself.

1962: Teflon Approved By FDA: Teflon cookware is approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration.

1951: DuPont starts using Teflon at its Washington Works Plant.

1949: DuPont launches Teflon on the market.

1945: Teflon Trademark:
Kinetic Chemicals registers the Teflon trademark in 1945.

1941: Kinetic Chemicals patented the new fluorinated plastic (Teflon) in 1941

1938: Teflon Discovered: Discovery of Teflon by Roy Plunkett, an employee of Kinetic Chemicals in New Jersey. Discovered by accident while Plunkett was working to create a refrigerator coolant, Teflon soon proved to be the most slippery substance in existence.

Learn More about Filing a DuPont C8 Lawsuit

Individuals, or their survivors, who lived or worked in one of six water districts covered by the 2005 DuPont Dupont C8 Lawsuit are entitled to file an individual DuPont C8 lawsuit if they suffered from any of the illnesses identified by the C8 Science Panel in October 2012. The six Ohio and West Virginia water districts covered by the 2005 DuPont Dupont C8 Lawsuit settlement include:

  • Little Hocking, Ohio
  • City of Belpre, Ohio
  • Tuppers Plains, Ohio
  • Village of Pomeroy, Ohio
  • Lubeck Public Service District, West Virginia
  • Mason County Public Service District, West Virginia

For a free, no obligation DuPont C8 lawsuit legal evaluation, please fill out the online form on the right, or call, toll-free, at 1-800-399-0795.

C8 Lawsuit News Information

The Columbus Dispatch: Doctors file monitoring plan for C8 exposure area

NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) : The C8 Health Project: Design, Methods, and Participants

NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) : Private drinking water wells as a source of exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in communities surrounding a fluoropolymer production facility.

NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) : Perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorooctanesulfonate, and serum lipids in children and adolescents: results from the C8 Health Project.

NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) : Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), an emerging drinking water contaminant: a critical review of recent literature.

FlourideAlert.org : Perfluorinated Chemicals

Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation : MDL No. 2433 – IN RE: E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company C-8 Personal Injury Litigation : Motion to Centralize